Locating Data

  • The information contained in GPCR-OKB can be accessed either by browsing or searching through any of the following concepts or combination of them: oligomer, protomer, method, phenotypic change, and/or physiological relevance. To get to the Browse or Search pages, click the "Browse" or "Search" links, respectively, in the navigation menu at the top of the page. The default search type is "Oligomer". The icons on the search and result pages will tell you more about what the different options mean and how to use them. More details about the search options follow.

    Searching by Oligomer Name

    You can search the information contained in GPCR-OKB by specifying the name of the oligomer of interest made up of the names of the protomers that form its constituent parts. The "Oligomer" option is checked by default. If you select the "Has phenotypic changes" option in the oligomer search field, you will limit your search to only oligomers with demonstrated phenotypic changes. Once you obtain the details about your oligomer, read the details contained in the icons to understand the type of data you are dealing with.

  • Searching by Protomer Name

    You can search the information contained in GPCR-OKB by specifying the name of the constituent subunits of the oligomer, and checking the "Protomer" option. If you select the "Has no known oligomers" option, you will extend your search to all GPCRs.

  • Searching by Method Type

    You can search the information contained in GPCR-OKB by specifying the computational or experimental procedures used to characterize the oligomer, e.g., Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET), Time Resolved FRET (TR-FRET), cross-linking, co-immunoprecipitation, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), correlated mutation analysis, etc. If you select the "Interface Discovered" option, you can retrieve available information about predicted molecular models.

  • Searching by Phenotypic Change

    You can search the information contained in GPCR-OKB by looking for phenotypic change recorded with specific ligands relative to any of the component protomers, e.g., specific signaling, ligand recognition, etc. A change occurs if the phenotype of the oligomer is significantly different from the phenotype of either one of the protomers (or the homodimers of those protomers) that participate in the oligomer.

    Searching by Physiological Relevance

    You can search the information contained in GPCR-OKB by looking for looking for physiological relevance, e.g., colocalization in native tissues, in vivo effects of hetero-oligomer specific ligands, in vivo phenotypic changes (e.g., pharmacological response or cooperativity) in knock-out animals, etc. One of the main requirements for the recognition and acceptance of GPCRs multimeric receptors recently defined by NC-IUPHAR [Pin J-P, Neubig R, Bouvier M, Devi L, Filizola M, Javitch JA, Lohse MJ, Milligan G, Palczewski K, Parmentier M, Spedding M: International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXVII. Recommendations for the Recognition and Nomenclature of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromultimers. Pharmacological Reviews 2007, 59(1):1-9.] is a firm demonstration of the actual physiological relevance of those oligomeric complexes/receptors. This is especially important in the case of heterooligomers, for which most of the results come from heterologous cellular systems where two different GPCRs are co-expressed simultaneously.